Thomas Friedman Highlights the Arab Cultural Divide

None of these Arab countries – Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, Saudi Arabia – are based on voluntary social contracts between the citizens inside their borders. They are all what others have called "tribes with flags" – not real countries in the Western sense. They are all civil wars either waiting to happen or being restrained from happening by the iron fist of one tribe over the others or, in the case of Syria in Lebanon, by one country over another.

What the Bush team has done in Iraq, by ousting Saddam, was not to "liberate" the country – an image and language imported from the West and inappropriate for Iraq – but rather to unleash the latent civil war in that country. Think of shaking a bottle of Champagne and then uncorking it.

Link: The New York Times > Opinion > Op-Ed Columnist: The Country We’ve Got.

We cannot liberate Iraq, and never could. Only Iraqis can liberate themselves, by first forging a social contract for sharing power and then having the will to go out and defend that compact against the minorities who will try to resist it. Elections are necessary for that process to unfold, but not sufficient. There has to be the will – among Shiites, Sunnis and Kurds – to forge that equitable social contract and then fight for it.

In short, we need these elections in Iraq to see if there really is a self-governing community there ready, and willing, to liberate itself – both from Iraq’s old regime and from us. The answer to this question is not self-evident. This was always a shot in the dark – but one that I would argue was morally and strategically worth trying.

Because if it is impossible for the peoples of even one Arab state to voluntarily organize themselves around a social contract for democratic life, then we are looking at dictators and kings ruling this region as far as the eye can see. And that will guarantee that this region will be a cauldron of oil-financed pathologies and terrorism for the rest of our lives.