How Green are electronics companies

Greenpeace International rates the big electronics companies.

Link: How the companies line up | Greenpeace International

7.7 Sony Ericsson – New leader due to improved takeback reporting, new models PVC free, but falls down on takeback practice. More
7.7 Samsung – Big improvements, with more products free of the worst toxic chemicals. Loses points for incomplete takeback practice. More
7.3 Sony – More products free of toxic PVC and improved reporting on recycling and takeback especially in the US. More
7.3 Dell – Unchanged since the last version, still no products on the market without the worst chemicals. More
7.3 Lenovo – Unchanged since the last version, still no products on the market without the worst chemicals. More
7 Toshiba – Much improved on toxic chemicals but still lobbies in the US for regressive takeback policies. More
7 LGE – Unchanged since the last version, need better takeback for products other than phones. More
7 Fujitsu-Siemens – Unchanged since the last version, needs toxic elimination timelines, better takeback coverage and reporting of amounts recycled.
More
6.7 Nokia– A steep fall! Strong on toxic chemicals but penalty point deducted for deficiencies in takeback practice in Thailand, Russia and Argentina during our testsing. More
6.7 HP – Finally provided timelines for eliminating worst toxic chemicals, though not for all products; needs to improve takeback coverage. More
6 Apple – Slightly improved with new iMacs and some iPods reducing the use of toxic chemicals, takeback programme still needs more work. More
5.7 Acer – Unchanged since the last version, needs better takeback coverage and reporting of amounts recycled. More
5 Panasonic – Unchanged since the last version, need better takeback coverage and reporting of amounts recycled. More
5 Motorola – Big faller due to penalty point for poor takeback practice in Philippines, Thailand and India revealed by our testing. Still no timelines for eliminating the most harmful chemicals. More
4.7 Sharp – New to the guide – some plus points on toxic chemicals elimination but poor takeback policy and practice. More
2.7 Microsoft – New to the guide – long timeline for toxic chemicals elimination (2011) and poor takeback policy and practice. More
2

Philips – New to the guide – no timeline for toxic chemicals elimination and zero points on e-waste policy and practice. More

0 Nintendo – New to the guide – first global brand to score zero across all criteria! More

via Ecogeek

Daniel Quinn Interviewed

EcoGeek interviews Daniel Quinn, thinker and author. The excerpt below highlights the human illusion that other species are expendable.

Link: EcoGeek of the Week: Daniel Quinn | EcoGeek

Earthworms are more important to the life of this planet than humans are, and if earthworms disappear, we humans will follow very soon after. It’s vital that we get it into our heads that we are members of a community and dependent on that community the same way every other member is. We cannot exist apart from it. We don’t "own" that community. We aren’t custodians of it (it takes care of itself and did so successfully for billions of years before our appearance). We need it, absolutely and forever; it doesn’t need us. If there are still people here in 200 years, they will know this without the slightest doubt.

PS: Earthworms are essential for healthy soil. Healthy soil is essential to food production. Petroleum-based fertilizers are not good for earthworms. Pesticides and herbicides are bad for earthworms.