How Green are electronics companies

Greenpeace International rates the big electronics companies.

Link: How the companies line up | Greenpeace International

7.7 Sony Ericsson – New leader due to improved takeback reporting, new models PVC free, but falls down on takeback practice. More
7.7 Samsung – Big improvements, with more products free of the worst toxic chemicals. Loses points for incomplete takeback practice. More
7.3 Sony – More products free of toxic PVC and improved reporting on recycling and takeback especially in the US. More
7.3 Dell – Unchanged since the last version, still no products on the market without the worst chemicals. More
7.3 Lenovo – Unchanged since the last version, still no products on the market without the worst chemicals. More
7 Toshiba – Much improved on toxic chemicals but still lobbies in the US for regressive takeback policies. More
7 LGE – Unchanged since the last version, need better takeback for products other than phones. More
7 Fujitsu-Siemens – Unchanged since the last version, needs toxic elimination timelines, better takeback coverage and reporting of amounts recycled.
More
6.7 Nokia– A steep fall! Strong on toxic chemicals but penalty point deducted for deficiencies in takeback practice in Thailand, Russia and Argentina during our testsing. More
6.7 HP – Finally provided timelines for eliminating worst toxic chemicals, though not for all products; needs to improve takeback coverage. More
6 Apple – Slightly improved with new iMacs and some iPods reducing the use of toxic chemicals, takeback programme still needs more work. More
5.7 Acer – Unchanged since the last version, needs better takeback coverage and reporting of amounts recycled. More
5 Panasonic – Unchanged since the last version, need better takeback coverage and reporting of amounts recycled. More
5 Motorola – Big faller due to penalty point for poor takeback practice in Philippines, Thailand and India revealed by our testing. Still no timelines for eliminating the most harmful chemicals. More
4.7 Sharp – New to the guide – some plus points on toxic chemicals elimination but poor takeback policy and practice. More
2.7 Microsoft – New to the guide – long timeline for toxic chemicals elimination (2011) and poor takeback policy and practice. More
2

Philips – New to the guide – no timeline for toxic chemicals elimination and zero points on e-waste policy and practice. More

0 Nintendo – New to the guide – first global brand to score zero across all criteria! More

via Ecogeek

Google, HP Invest Big in Renewables

GreenBiz News provides some good news for green-necks. Good news is always welcome!

Link: GreenBiz News | Google, HP Invest Big in Renewables.

Hoping to spur a green power revolution, Google plans to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in developing renewable energy that costs less than conventional coal-fired electricity, the company announced Tuesday.

Meanwhile, HP also said Tuesday it is delving deeper into renewables by building a solar power installation at a San Diego, Calif., facility and buying enough renewable energy in Ireland to satisfy 90 percent of its needs there.

Google’s R&D initiative, Renewable Energy Cheaper Than Coal, will explore advanced renewable technologies, such as solar thermal, wind, enhanced geothermal, and other potent breakthroughs in its quest to produce one gigawatt – – enough to power a city the size of San Francisco — in "years, not decades," said Google Co-Founder Larry Page.

Cheap and plentiful coal is responsible for about 40 percent of world power generation and is a leading cause of greenhouse gas emissions.

Page told the Associated Press the company wants to bring down the cost of solar power by 25 percent to 50 percent. The company is now hiring engineers and energy experts to lead the research and development, first focusing on solar thermal technology and enhanced geothermal systems.

Google’s foundation, Google.org, will work with the initiative to spend "tens of millions of dollars" on research next year, with hundreds of millions more following for breakthrough renewable energy projects. Google’s foundation is reportedly sitting on a war chest of company stock totaling nearly $2 billion.

Already the foundation is working with eSolar Inc. of Pasadena, Calif., and Makani Power Inc. of Alameda, Calif., on promising technologies. eSolar specializes in solar thermal power which replaces the fuel in traditional power plants while Makani is developing high-altitude wind energy extraction technologies.

Google has already made forays into the renewable energy and alternative fuel arenas with the installation of a corporate 1.6 megawatt solar array on its Mountain View campus and a plug-in vehicle initiative designed to help bring the technologies to mass market.