Creative Thinking: Water Windmill

An invention that will very useful if it works, reported by Paul O’Callaghan at the Cleantech blog.

Link: Cleantech Blog: There’s water in dem dar clouds!.

Max Whisson, an energetic septuagenarian inventor, believes he can solve the current water crisis with his Water Windmill invention, a unique technology to extract moisture from the atmosphere. The concept is to use windmills to cool air and extract water directly from the air and was partly inspired from an African beetle, Stenocara, who manages to be completely water sufficient by standing on his head in the desert and using cooling plates on his body to extract water vapor from the air (video below).

The "Whisson Windmill" will make it possible to get adequate water anywhere at any time, drought or no drought" says Dr. Whisson.

Beautiful Image: Pamukkale, Turkey

Pamukkale, meaning "cotton castle" in Turkish, is a natural site and attraction in south-western Turkey in the Denizli Province. Pamukkale is located in Turkey’s Inner Aegean region, in the River Menderes valley, which enjoys a temperate climate over the greater part of the year. (Wikipedia)

Pamukkale, Turkey

Photo by blue foot  on Flickr

Travertine is a kind of rock which is formed as calcium bicarbonate precipitates out of hot spring water. It may be formed in many ways under different atmospheric conditions. Geological activity of the past affected a large area in which the Pamukkale thermal springs are found. There are 17 thermal sources in this special area with temperatures ranging between 35-100°C. The source of Pamukkale is only one unit of that whole area. The thermal water flows to the top of the cascades by a 320-meter-long channel and then flows on the cascades about 240-300 m. CaCO3 begins to precipitate on the cascades as the carbon dioxide evaporates, but in the beginning the precipitate is soft like gel. It needs time to completely dry and harden. In order to protect the cascades from destruction and to preserve their natural beauty, entrance to the travertine area has been prohibited.

Drawing and Writing about Deer

Some diversions from the more serious issues that surround us.

Roping a Deer – author unknown

I had this idea that I was going to rope a deer, put it in a stall, sweet feed it on corn for a few weeks, then butcher it and eat it. Yum! The first step in this adventure was getting a deer.

Since they congregate at my cattle feeder and do not have much fear of me (a bold one will sometimes come right up and sniff at the bags of feed while I am in the back of the truck four feet away) it should not be difficult to rope one, toss a bag over its head to calm it down, then hog tie it and transport it home.

I filled the cattle feeder and hid down at the end with my rope. The cattle, having seen a roping or two before, stayed well back. They were not having any of it.

After 20 minutes, my deer showed up, 3 of them. I picked a likely looking one, stepped out, and threw my rope. The deer just stood there and stared at me. I wrapped the rope around my waist and twisted the end so I would have a good hold. The deer still just stood and stared at me, but you could tell it was mildly concerned about the whole rope situation.

I took a step towards it. It took a step away. I put a little tension on the rope, and received an education. The first thing I learned is that, while a deer may just stand there looking at you funny while you rope it, it is spurred to action when you start pulling on that rope.

That deer EXPLODED.

The second thing I learned is that, pound for pound, a deer is a LOT stronger than a cow or a colt. A cow or a colt in that weight range I could fight down with some dignity. A deer? No chance.

That thing ran and bucked, it twisted and pulled. There was no controlling that deer, and certainly no getting close to it. As it jerked me off my feet and started dragging me across the ground, it occurred to me that having a deer firmly attached to a rope was not such a good idea. The only upside is that they do not have much stamina.

A brief ten minutes later, it was tired, and not as quick to jerk me off my feet and drag me. It took me a few minutes to realize this, since I was mostly blinded by the blood flowing out of the big gash in my head.

At that point, I had lost my appetite for cornfed venison. I hated the thing, and would hazard a guess that the feeling was mutual. I just wanted to get that devil creature off the end of that rope. But if I let it go with the rope hanging around its neck, it would likely die slow and painful somewhere.

Despite the gash in my head, and several large knots where I had cleverly arrested the deer’s pell mell flight by bracing my head against large rocks as it dragged me across the ground, I could still think clearly enough to recognize that I shared some tiny amount of responsibility for the situation we were in. I didn’t want the deer to suffer a slow death.

I managed to get it lined up between my truck and the feeder, a little trap I had set beforehand, like a squeeze chute. I backed it in there, and I started moving forward to get my rope back.

Did you know that deer bite? They do!

I never in a million years would have thought that a deer would bite, so I was very surprised when I reached up there to grab hold of that rope, and the deer grabbed hold of my wrist. Now, when a deer bites you, it is not like a horse, it does not just bite and let go. A deer bites and shakes its head, like a pit bull. They bite HARD and won’t let go. It hurts!

The proper reaction when a deer bites you is probably to freeze and draw back slowly. I tried screaming and wrenching away. My method was ineffective. It felt like that deer bit and shook me for several minutes, but it was likely only several seconds.

I, being smarter than a deer (though you may be questioning that claim by now) tricked it. While I kept it busy tearing the bejesus out of my right arm, I reached up with my left hand and pulled that rope loose. That was when I learned my final lesson in deer behavior for the day.

Deer will strike at you with their front feet. They rear right up and strike at head and shoulder level, and their hooves are surprisingly sharp. I learned long ago that when an animal–like a horse–strikes at you with its hooves and you can’t get away, the best thing to do is make a loud noise and move aggressively towards the animal. This will cause them to back down a bit, so you can make your escape.

This was not a horse. This was a deer. Obviously, such trickery would not work. In the course of a millisecond, I devised a different strategy. I screamed like a woman and turned to run.

The reason we have been taught NOT to turn and run from a horse that paws at you, is that there is a good chance that it will hit you in the back of the head. Deer are not so different from horses after all, other than being twice as strong and three times as evil. The second I turned to run, it hit me right in the back of the head and knocked me down.

When a deer paws at you and knocks you down, it does not immediately depart. I suspect it does not recognize that the danger has passed. What they do instead is paw your back, and jump up and down on you, while you are laying there crying like a little girl and covering your head.

I finally managed to crawl under the truck, and the deer went away. Now I know why when people go deer hunting they bring a rifle with a scope. It’s so they can be somewhat equal to the prey.

Video sharing sites

TubeMogul provides a handy table describing the top video-sharing sites.

Link: Tubemogul.com – Why should Video Marketing be included in your marketing mix?.

Description Demographics Registration Upload Notes
YouTube No intro needed here Evenly female/male audience, even age distribution, U.S. East and West coasts. Easy Fast review process, mainly automated Experimenting with ad sharing
Yahoo! Video An original video destination, but late to the game Slight more male viewers, slightly older, even US geographic distribution Medium Relatively slow and unpredictable review process
MySpace Primarily a social networking site, but video is still huge High percentage of female and under 18 viewers Easy No review process. Videos go live immediately Being rebranded as MySpaceTV
Metacafe Popular worlwide, prides itself on community votes driving featured content Skews towards older, more educated, male viewers Easy Fast human review process Offers ad sharing
Google Video Increasingly becoming more of a video search engine Slightly more male viewers, disproportionately more Hispanic audience Medium Limited review process. Unlimited content length and size Integrates with other Google apps like Web Albums and Picasa
Revver One of the firrst video sites to offer ad revenue sharing Slightly older, white male crowd Easy Discriminating human review process Ads inserted into all videos
DailyMotion The YouTube of Europe Overwhelmingly white male. Higher age and income than most Easy Fast and easy Growing in the US
Blip.tv Publisher-friendly video sharing and distribution site Slightly more male, slightly higher income level than most video sites, even ethnic distribution Easy Easy Publisher can choose to insert ads
Brightcove Trying to bring TV to the internet Even split male and female. Few under 18 viewers Easy Easy Ad share options available
Crackle Focused on making people stars Largely male, disproportionately African-American audience Easy Slick Flash upload tool allows many videos in one shot Owned by Sony
Veoh Focused on full-screen video programming for anyone with a broadband connection Slightly more male viewers, predominantly Asian, distributed across all age categories Medium Easy Investors include Michael Eisner and Time Warner